m.c. escher of incompetence

As we scramble to find villains and decisionmakers to blame in the Covid-19 pandemic, let’s be clear:

You can criticise the Chinese government and the PRC’s communist regime for cover-ups and misinformation…

You can criticise the WHO for its continued refusal to include Taiwan, a country whose geographic, economic and social proximity to China renders it critical in both receiving and providing up-to-date and transparent data instead of first flowing through the processing plant that is Beijing…

You can criticise Donald Trump and his administration for gross negligence and mishandling of the dual crises (health and economic) in the US…

You can criticise Trump for his racist repackaging of the virus as the ‘Chinese virus’ and ‘Wuhan virus’…

You can criticise Trump for his attempt to use the WHO as a scapegoat and his threats to halt funding to the organisation during a pandemic…

You can criticise them all. At the same time. It’s okay. It’s an intransient M.C. Escher painting of incompetence where there are no sides to take and where the enemy of your enemy is still your enemy.

we could if we wanted to… climate action

Greta Thunberg is extraordinary. We should all strive for the clear-mindedness, dedication and purpose-driven action that she exhibits.

How Greta Thunberg Transformed Existential Dread Into A Movement – The New Yorker

The article from The New Yorker (link above), drawing heavily on quotes from a book that she co-authored with her family, is a fascinating chronicle of her difficult childhood and adolescence and the lens through which she perceives and understands the world. It makes an interesting comparison between the difference in reaction, of governments and individuals, to the climate change crisis and to the current pandemic caused by the coronavirus.Read More »

supreme court of canada guarantees voting rights for non-residents

January 11, 2019, CBC News: Supreme Court of Canada guarantees voting rights for expats

People challenge my Canadian-ness all the time. It’s an unnerving microaggression that comes with the business of being a Canadian person of colour among white Europeans for whom citizenship – especially achieved through naturalisation, not birth – is somehow not enough. Not to put too fine a point on it, but this is the context in which I lost my Charter-protected right to vote four years ago.Read More »